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Creating Meaningful Rubrics - Program

Page history last edited by Stan Freeda 1 year ago

Creating Meaningful Rubrics that Assess Student Learning

NH Science Teachers Association Fall Conference, 2011   Monday, October 24

NH Science Teachers Association Spring Conference, 2012   Monday, March 12

NH Science Teachers Association Fall Conference, 2014   Monday, November 3

            Chester Academy Teachers Workshop,   Thursday, February 2, 2017

             NH Science Teachers Association Fall Conference, 2017   Monday, October 16

 

Description

Rubrics have been in use for many years now.  But just how effective are they in helping both you and your students understand what was learned.  In order to be meaningful, for both teachers and students, rubrics have to be more than just scoring tools that list criteria for a piece of work that will count for the grade.  They have to be developed in such a way that they measure learning appropriately, and that they are independent of any subjectivity the scorer may bring.  In this workshop, you will explore the components of rubrics and how they are used to develop meaningful assessments.  You will consider both summative and formative rubrics.  You will collaborate with other teachers to clearly identify the goals and objectives of a student product and be able to assess those products for learning.  A backward design approach will be used to develop a process you can use to develop meaningful rubrics that engage students in their assessment process.  You are encouraged to bring a laptop with wireless connectivity to access online resources, but it is not a requirement for participation. 

 

 

 

View the Creating Rubrics Presentation on Google Drive.

 

Collaborative Activity

Select a NH Curriculum Standard that you want to teach.

Think about what evidence you would accept to assess proficiency.

Discuss and develop with group or individually.

Share with entire room using the document, Creating Meaningful Rubrics Workshop Activity, shared on Google Docs.

Discuss.

 

NH College and Career Ready Standards

Education standards help educators understand what students should know and be able to demonstrate by providing clear goals for student learning.   http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/index.htm

 

Backward Design

 

Center for Teaching:  Understanding by Design   http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/teaching-guides/pedagogical/understanding-by-design/

Center for Teaching and Faculty Excellence:  Backward Design    https://ctfe.gmu.edu/teaching/backward-design

           Backward Design Lesson Plan Template

 

Formative and Summative Assessments

 

Key Differences between Formative and Summative Assessments   http://www.edudemic.com/summative-and-formative-assessments/

Formative Assessment from the Glossary of Education Reform   http://edglossary.org/formative-assessment/

Summative Assessment from the Glossary of Education Reform   http://edglossary.org/summative-assessment/

For Every Child Multiple Measures Infographic   http://21k12.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/info.jpg

 

Validity and Reliability

 

Scoring Rubric Development: Validity and Reliability   http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=7&n=10 

Exploring Reliability in Academic Assessment   http://www.uni.edu/chfasoa/reliabilityandvalidity.htm 

 

Parts of a Rubric

 

The Rubric Debate: Building a Better Mousetrap   http://faculty.ccp.edu/dept/viewpoints/w06v7n2/rubrics1.htm

Classroom Assessment: Performance Assessment  http://fcit.usf.edu/assessment/performance/assessb.html

Understanding Rubrics  http://www.middleweb.com/rubricsHG.html

Creating a Rubric: An Online Tutorial for Faculty   http://www.ucdenver.edu/faculty_staff/faculty/center-for-faculty-development/Documents/Tutorials/Rubrics/index.htm 

Why Teachers Should Use Rubrics Infographic   http://elearninginfographics.com/why-teachers-should-use-rubrics-infographic/

 

Performance Criteria

What the teacher/assessor needs to see the student demonstrate in order to believe that the student learned the standard.  These are the Learning or Behavioral Objectives which students need to demonstrate..

 

Writing Curriculum - Aims, Goals, and Objectives (Leslie Wilson)   http://thesecondprinciple.com/instructional-design/writing-curriculum/

How to Write Behavioral Objectives  http://www.ehow.com/how_2243283_write-behavioral-objectives.html 

Behavioral Objectives And How to Write Them    http://med.fsu.edu/index.cfm?page=facultydevelopment.behavobjectives 

Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Write Effective Learning Objectives (New Bloom)    https://tips.uark.edu/using-blooms-taxonomy/ 

Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy (Old Bloom)   http://teaching.uncc.edu/learning-resources/articles-books/best-practice/goals-objectives/writing-objectives 

Writing Instructional Goals and Objectives   http://www.personal.psu.edu/bxb11/Objectives/GoalsAndObjectives_print.html

 

Measurement Scale

 

Checklists, Rating Scales, and Rubrics  http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/mewa/html/assessment/checklists.html

Creating a Rubric    http://fcit.usf.edu/assessment/performance/assessb.html

Creating a Rubric   http://assessment.aas.duke.edu/documents/CreatingaRubric.pdf

Developing a Scoring Rubric   http://www.gallaudet.edu/office_of_academic_quality/assessment_of_student_learning_outcomes/instructions_and_examples/developing_a_scoring_criteria_%28rubrics%29.html

 

 

A Rubric for Judging your Rubric

http://www.ucdenver.edu/faculty_staff/faculty/center-for-faculty-development/Documents/Tutorials/Rubrics/4_quality/5_rubric_rubric.htm

 

Quality is written into the measurement scale.  Much language is repeated.  There can be confusion if a criterion has multiple elements.  This rubric appears more Summative.

 

A Rubric for Judging Your Rubric

Criteria Beginning Developing Accomplished Exemplary
Statement of Purpose. Purpose is clearly stated Purpose is not clearly stated. Purpose is somewhat clearly stated. Purpose is mostly clearly stated. Purpose is very clearly stated.
Criteria.
  • observable and measurable
  • reflect important and essential elements
  • distinct from other criteria
  • clear and unambiguous language.
Few of the criteria are observable and measurable; few reflect the most important and essential elements of the task; few are written with clear and unambiguous language. Some of the criteria are observable and measurable; some reflect the most important and essential elements of the task; some are written with clear and unambiguous language. Most of the criteria are observable and measurable; most reflect the most important and essential elements of the task; most are written with clear and unambiguous language. All of the criteria are observable and measurable; all reflect the most important and essential elements of the task; all are written with clear and unambiguous language.
Rating Scale. The number of items reflects purpose of assessment. The number of rating points does not reflect the purpose of the assessment. The number of rating points somewhat reflects the purpose of the assessment. The number of rating points mostly reflects the purpose of the assessment. The number of rating points clearly reflects the purpose of the assessment.
Performance Descriptors.
  • observable and measurable
  • use parallel language across the scale
  • indicate amount, frequency or intensity
Few of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; few use parallel language across the scale; few indicate amount, frequency or intensity. Some of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; some use parallel language across the scale; some indicate amount, frequency or intensity. Most of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; most use parallel language across the scale; most indicate amount, frequency or intensity. All of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; all use parallel language across the scale; all indicate amount, frequency or intensity.
Reliability.
  • inter-rater reliability (consistent scoring among multiple graders)
  • intra-rater reliability (consistent scores with the same grader over time)
Rubric does not provide inter-rater or intra-rater reliability. Rubric provides some inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Rubric mostly provides inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Rubric provides strong inter-rater and intra-rater reliability.
Validity.
  • content validity (skills measured represent the skills in the broader domain area)
  • construct validity (criteria reflect the knowledge and skills you are attempting to measure)
  • criterion validity (rubric score is similar to a score given in a real-world context)
  • face validity (rubric appears to be valid to its users)
Rubric does not provide content, construct, criterion, or face validity. Rubric provides some content, construct, criterion, and face validity. Rubric mostly provides content, construct, criterion, and face validity. Rubric provides strong content, construct, criterion, and face validity.

 

In the alteration of the above rubric, quality is written into the criteria and the scale determines the degree of quality.  This rubric appears more Formative. 

 

A Rubric for Judging Your Rubric

Criteria Beginning Developing Accomplished Exemplary

Statement of Purpose.

Purpose is very clearly stated

never sometimes mostly always

Criteria.

All of the criteria provided in the rubric: 

  • are observable and measurable
  • reflect important and essential elements
  • are distinct from other criteria
  • are written in clear and unambiguous language.
few of these are present some of these are present most of these are present all of these are present
Rating Scale. The number of items clearly reflects the purpose of assessment. not present somewhat often always
Performance Descriptors.
  • observable and measurable
  • use parallel language across the scale
  • indicate amount, frequency or intensity
Few of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; few use parallel language across the scale; few indicate amount, frequency or intensity. Some of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; some use parallel language across the scale; some indicate amount, frequency or intensity. Most of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; most use parallel language across the scale; most indicate amount, frequency or intensity. All of the performance descriptors are observable and measurable; all use parallel language across the scale; all indicate amount, frequency or intensity.
Reliability.
  • inter-rater reliability (consistent scoring among multiple graders)
  • intra-rater reliability (consistent scores with the same grader over time)
Rubric does not provide inter-rater or intra-rater reliability. Rubric provides some inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Rubric mostly provides inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Rubric provides strong inter-rater and intra-rater reliability.
Validity.
  • content validity (skills measured represent the skills in the broader domain area)
  • construct validity (criteria reflect the knowledge and skills you are attempting to measure)
  • criterion validity (rubric score is similar to a score given in a real-world context)
  • face validity (rubric appears to be valid to its users)
Rubric does not provide content, construct, criterion, or face validity. Rubric provides some content, construct, criterion, and face validity. Rubric mostly provides content, construct, criterion, and face validity. Rubric provides strong content, construct, criterion, and face validity.

 

 

Congratulations!

 

 

Past Presentations

 

View the presentation in VoiceThread to enlarge.  Creating Rubrics

 

View the presentation in Slideshare to enlarge.  Creating Meaningful Rubrics

 

 

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